‘Color & Picture Knitting” book, the charts

Here are some of the charts in the book:

These are the first ones, being easy knits:

 

More landscapes and how to knit the border as you knit along:

 

These are pictures that were done with the same chart (the chart is for the blue one):

 

Portraits, show knitting in ‘invisible’ technique using 1 yarn and reverse st.st to create the image, and the advantage of knitting sideways:

Charts about working from drawing:

 

And adding your own writing:

 

Special techniques (knitting in quilting & weaving styles):

How to knit a group project (no charts here):

 

And some heart charts we used in these projects:

I enjoyed knitting them all!

Advertisements

‘Color & Picture Knitting’ book

b_cp

 

Dear Tracy,

I can not find your comment, so will answer you here, as other people asked about the book too.

The book is a work book. It explains how to knit pictures, from easy ones to more involved. The patterns in it are like exercises. They are meant for you to knit them and hopefully hang them on your wall or give as gifts.

You may not sell my patterns, but you may do many pictures using the charts in the book, and even sell the pictures you knitted yourself.

I am saying that the charts are exercises because my purpose was to give you enough information so that you can continue to make your own charts and do your own pictures.

So, to sum it up, the patterns in the book are for you to knit in order to learn the techniques used.

After the picture is knitted and BO, you can block it. For this you will need to stretch it upside down on foam board or anything else handy, spray lightly with water and let dry for 24 hours. Because of spraying it with water, you need to use stainless steel pins. You can buy them in a sewing store.

Some people prefer ironing their knits, I do not.

After the picture is well dry, you can attach it to foam board that is cut to fit the size of the picture. For this you can use straight pins (they do not have to be stainless steel).

Some people glue the picture instead of using pins, I do not.

See next blog post for detailed account of the charts in the book.

The book is available on Amazon.com

Good Luck, hope you’ll enjoy it, and feel free to ask questions.

 

How to knit a picture

Even now, after almost 20 years of knitting pictures ( /tapestry / wall hanging ), it’s still scary.

I run around telling myself: I don’t know how to do it! I don’t know how I did it before! I’m a terrible knitter! and so on.

So, here is my real ‘how to knit pictures’:

1. BE BRAVE! tell yourself you can do it, and  just start!

No matter the gauge, the yarn & color matching. Instead of wasting time in mastering all that and trying to get it perfect – just start knitting. Believe me – it is faster this way.

2. Mid way: even if the knitting looks like  – – – – ,  and not at all like what  it suppose to look, even  if the images are totally unclear, and even if you have a hole in the middle:

GO ON KNITTING!

You can always fix things later. A big part of knitting pictures is to have faith. If it looks terrible when its done – start again using all the knowledge you gained by LETTING YOURSELF FINISH the first picture. Again – it is faster this way.

3. ALMOST THE END, and you still want to undo because it looks bad and totally un-beautiful and so on – resist unraveling temptation (it comes from the devil whispering in your ear), and finish.

Once done – do all the corrections needed.

Often, the simple act of stretching while framing the picture, will put everything into place.

GOOD LUCK

🙂

p.s. yes – technicality, being a good knitter etc. does not really matters. What matters is having the passion in your heart.